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101 Sales Qualification Questions

From basic information to upselling existing customers, use these 101 sales questions throughout the various stages of the buying cycle.




Introduction

Every great sale starts by answering questions – and these questions are essential for qualifying contacts throughout every step of the buyer’s journey to see who would and would not be a fitting customer for your business.


From the basics of name and location, to qualifying questions inspired by the BANT framework (budget, need, authority, and timeline), to questions about closing and upselling, below are 101 questions for you to ask in the sales process to continuously qualify a prospect as ripe for a sale.


Read on for 101 sales qualification questions to keep in your sales arsenal.


Questions to Ask Yourself

Before attempting to qualify a contact, ask yourself what you’re looking for in a potential customer with these questions. Otherwise, you may be setting yourself up for a dissatisfied customer and high churn rates.


1. What regions will you serve and not serve?

2. What is the lowest you’re able to discount?

3. What is the ideal size of your customer?

4. What industries do you serve?

5. What are your tradeoffs?

6. Who are your buyer personas?

7. How quickly are you able to go from sale to handoff/implementation?

6. Who are your buyer personas?

Developing a fictionalized version of your ideal customer, known as a “buyer persona,” helps your sales team quickly identify which leads are worth pursuing as prospective customers.


Awareness Questions

Don’t forget to ask for basic information during early communication.

Typically, you can gather this information through a form for when contacts download content or request more information from your company.


8. What is your name?

9. What is your email address?

10. What is your phone number?

11. What is your company name?

12. What is your company website?

13. What is your company’s location?

14. What is your job title?

15. Is your company business-to-business or business-to-consumer?

16. Does your company offer products, services, or both?

17. What industry are you in?

18. How many employees does your company have?

19. How many customers does your company have?

20. How old is your company?

21. Would you like a demo/consultation?

22. Would you like to subscribe to our blog?

23. What is your social media handle?

24. Which of the following are you most interested in learning more about?

24. Which of the following are you interested in learning more about?


On your forms, provide a list of options your company addresses to see where their needs and your solutions align.


BANT Questions

Budget, Authority, Need, and Timeline


The BANT framework for sales qualification hits the four main areas a salesperson needs to address when working a lead. These questions should be asked on your first discovery call and should set the standards for your negotiations with the potential buyer.


Budget Questions

25. Do you currently have a budget allocated for this solution, or will you have to make the case for one?

26. What is your budget for this solution?

27. Is [price range] within your budget?

28. How much have you spent on similar solutions in the past?

29. What is your annual revenue?

30. Are you comfortable with our billing cycle? (Annually, etc.)

31. Would you agree to annual billing if we can provide a discount?

32. Would you be willing to meet us at our price if it means great service?

32. Would you be willing to meet us at our price if it means great service?


Better products tend to cost more. Get a feel for this contact’s desire for great customer service – especially if that’s something your company prides itself on.


Authority Questions

33. Are you the decision maker?

34. If not, who is the decision maker?

35. Is there anyone else in your company you’d like or need to include in these discussions?

36. Do you anticipate any pushback from your colleagues or superiors against this solution?

37. Who first decided to explore the idea of this solution within your company?

38. What are the best times/days to follow up with you for next steps throughout this process?

35. Is there anyone else in your company you’d like or need to include in these discussions?


This questions identifies early on if there is a superior, colleague, or coworker that would need buy-in for the decision. Larger teams or multiple decision makers mean you may have to address the sale from multiple angles.


Need Questions

39. What are your biggest challenges this year?

40. What are your biggest priorities this year?

41. What has your growth been to date?

42. What are your business growth goals for this year?

43. One of the most common issues we keep hearing about [blank]. Is this an issue for you?

44. Who are your biggest competitors?

45. What are your company’s competitive strengths and weaknesses?

46. How much emphasis do you place on service in a package like this?

43. One of the most common issues we keep hearing about is [blank]. Is this an issue for you?


If your product and/or service addresses a commonly faced but rarely addressed issue or area for this company or individual, use this question as an opportunity to let your prospect know about it.


44. What are your company’s competitive strengths and weaknesses?

Ask this question to see if your product and/or service can enhance their strengths and help them address their weaknesses and turn them into strengths


Timeline Questions

47. What’s prompting you to do something about this challenge/opportunity now?

48. How urgent is the issue?

49. What is your timeline for making a decision?

50. What is your timeline for seeing results?

51. How long have you been facing this problem/dealing with these pain points?

52. How soon would you be open to install/onboarding/delivery?

49. What is your timeline for making a decision?


Enterprise level deals could take years. Purchases for smaller businesses or individuals could occur within a day. Set the proper standards for yourself and your leads by determining a reasonable timeline for negotiation, closing, and handoff.


Business Impact Questions

Understanding the specific impact your solution will have for this one potential client – rather than understanding the general impact of your product on a similar client – helps you provide more personalized service and a custom approach for a more likely sale.


53. What does quantitative success look like for your business?

54. What are your necessities from this deal should it happen?

55. What spillover benefits or qualitative results would you like to see from this deal?

56. What are your normal daily tasks so I can better understand how we could help you?

57. How do you see your business needs changing as your company evolves?

58. Which teams/departments would be affected/would benefit from this?

59. Should we make a deal, who would need to be ramped up/trained on your end?

60. To what extent does seasonality impact your business?

55. What spillover benefits or qualitative results would you like to see from this deal?

Soft benefits – such as clearer communication, more efficiency, and less stress throughout the work day – can make the sale more enticing if you can deliver them.

57. How do you see your business needs changing as your company evolves?

Businesses change all the time. Get an understanding for how the contact’s needs will shift in the future to get a solid understanding of how you will – or won’t – be able to support.


Competitor & Industry Questions

You can use the sales qualification process to better understand your own industry and understand your positioning in your market better.


61. Have you tried a solution like ours in the past?

62. If/when you tried to address this issue in the past, what was the result?

63. Why did you choose to consider us?

64. What do you know about us, our product, and/or our service?

65. Are you exploring any other options or consulting with any other solution in our industry?

66. What is it about [competitor] that has you considering them?

67. How did you hear about us?

68. Would we be replacing a current solution/supplier, or is this your first time working with a company in this industry?

69. Which company or provider are you currently working with for this?

70. Do you have a contract with one of our competitors?

71. Why did you initially choose to go with that company?

72. Why are you considering changing suppliers/partners at this time?

73. What specifically are you looking for in a deal with a new provider/partner?

74. Why are you unsatisfied with the current solution/state?

75. Is there any chance you’ll decide to stay with your current solution, or are you definitely moving on?


67. How did you hear about us?


This question provides helpful feedback for your marketing team. Even if it’s anecdotal, knowledge on how your contacts came to know of your company can help you position yourself in front of the right audience, with the right medium, at the right time.



70. Do you have a contract with one of our competitors?


If someone has an existing contract, that could impact timeline and budget.

You may be forced with the decision of whether or not to help buy the prospect out of its current contract.


75. Is there any chance you’ll decide to stay with your current solution, or are you definitely moving on?


This helps you gauge how committed to your competitor they are. Maybe they’re just price shopping, or maybe they’re ready to abandon ship. All of this impacts the likelihood of the deal.


Advancement Questions

As the deal gets closer, ask these questions to see if you’ll actually close and to address any final roadblocks.




76. What’s the best way to communicate with you moving forward?

77. It seems like this would be a good fit for you. What do you think?

78. Do you have any concerns I can address at this time?

79. Are there any reasons why we can’t move forward at this time?

80. Based on what I’ve described, do you believe what I’m able to offer can address your needs?

81. Does this sound like something that would be beneficial to your business?

82. Right now, what would you say could stop us from working together?

83. Do you have any concerns about how our product/service would work?

77. It seems like this would be a good fit for you. What do you think?


Open-ended questions give the platform to the person you’re working with. In this case, prospects might struggle to come up with a concern, or might raise a potential red flag. Either way, you’re given feedback on how close you are to closing.


Closing Questions

Time to seal the deal. Ask these questions to see if your prospect is headed to the finish line.


84. If we meet your price, is there any reason you wouldn’t make a deal with me today?

85. If I could find a way to address that final concern, would that be enough to make you feel comfortable signing today?

86. What if I can offer free [upgrade]? Would that make you feel comfortable signing today?

87. Are you all set to review the contract?

88. Can you commit to doing business by signing a contract today?

89. I can only guarantee this price until [date] – does that time frame work for you?

84. If we meet your price, is there any reason you wouldn’t make a deal with me today?


Oftentimes, there are other concerns than price. Once a number is agreed upon, make sure there’s nothing else holding the prospect back from making the deal.


86. What if I can offer free [upgrade]?

Would that make you feel comfortable signing today?


If a prospect is looking for one last freebie before signing, ask this question to see if that’s the case. If not, there’s a bigger issue to address before moving forward with the sale.


Revisit Questions

If a prospect says no, they may just need a few more months to come back and sign. And if they do come back, you’ll want to know what’s changed since you last spoke.


Closed – Not Now Questions

90. Would you consider us in the future should things not work out?

91. Why is it that you’ve decided to say no at this time?

92. Could we connect again in six months?

91. Why is it you’ve decided to say no at this time?


This question is imperative for company-wide loss analysis. Plus, if there’s a chance of working this lead in the future, it’s good to know exactly why it didn’t work out this time.


Resurfaced Lead Questions

93. What’s changed in the past [timeline] that makes you want to consider working with us again?

94. Is [price range] still the budget you’re looking at?

95. Has anything else pertaining to our deal changed since we last touched base?

Upselling Questions

Don’t forget – you can qualify and sell to existing customers through upselling or reordering. If you think a customer could use more of your offering, ask these questions.

96. Has our product/service lived up to your expectations?

97. Have you seen improvement to your revenue with our product?

98. Have you thought about renewing/reordering?

99. Is there anything we need to address that would keep you from reordering/renewing?

100. Have you looked into our solution on [blank]?

101. Do you need assistance in [area], which we have a solution/offering for?

96. Has our product/service lived up to your expectations?


If your client isn’t in a good place with your company, it would be wiser to address their pain points before asking for more of their money.


97. Have you seen improvement to your revenue with our product/service?


If clients admit they’re seeing a revenue or profit boost because of your company, that means they realize the value of it and may be open to what else you offer.


100. Have you looked into our solution on [blank]?


If you’ve released a new product or feature that addresses a common issue, your clients may not know about it. This is your chance to see if they have, and if they would want to purchase it.

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